Tagged: Owners

Contractor’s Violation of Pennsylvania’s HICPA Registration Requirement Does Not Bar Quantum Meruit or Mechanics Lien Claims 0

Contractor’s Violation of Pennsylvania’s HICPA Registration Requirement Does Not Bar Quantum Meruit or Mechanics Lien Claims

The Pennsylvania Home Improvement Consumer Protection Act, 73 P.S. § 517.1, et. seq. (“HICPA”), became effective on July 1, 2009. The HICPA is designed to protect purchasers of home improvement services from contractors engaging in fraudulent business practices. It requires contractors who perform more than $5,000 of work per year, and whose company is worth less than $50,000,000, to register with the Pennsylvania Office of the Attorney General (“OAG”), and comply with HICPA’s substantive requirements. The HICPA requires contractors to enter into written contracts for performance of improvements, specifies provisions which must be included in the written contract (§ 517.7(a)), and identifies other provisions the inclusion of which makes the contract voidable by the owner (§ 517.7(e)). Finally, certain acts on the part of contractors, including failure to register with the OAG (id. § 517.9) are prohibited by the HICPA, which sets forth criminal penalties for fraud (§ 517.8). Significantly, a violation of the Act is also deemed to be a violation of the Unfair Trade Practices and Consumer Protection Law, 73 P.S. § 201-1 et. seq.

Contracting Around the Discovery Rule: The Oregon Court of Appeals Enforces a Clause in a Construction Contract That Defined the Date of Accrual 0

Contracting Around the Discovery Rule: The Oregon Court of Appeals Enforces a Clause in a Construction Contract That Defined the Date of Accrual

Parties to construction contracts often include provisions that set forth time frames to file actions arising out of the contract that are different than the applicable statute of limitations. In the absence of any statutory prohibition, contract provisions limiting the time to file an action to less than the applicable statute of limitations are generally enforceable provided the time frame is reasonable. Although perhaps less common, some construction contracts include provisions that attempt to define when the applicable limitations period begins to run (i.e. when causes of action arising out of the contract accrue).

Copyrighted Designs Afford Basis for Federal Court Claims for Infringement by Architects Seeking Payment for Their Design Drawings 0

Copyrighted Designs Afford Basis for Federal Court Claims for Infringement by Architects Seeking Payment for Their Design Drawings

Disputes can arise when a design professional prepares plans for an owner and the owner then uses those plans without compensating the architect. In H2L2 Architects/Planners, LLC v. Tower Investments, Inc., a case from the Eastern District of Pennsylvania, the court considered the pleading requirements for unpaid architects to assert claims for payment against owners/developers for architectural design and drawings under federal law.

Caveat Venditor (Supplier Beware): The Importance of Accurate Accounting When Providing Materials to Contractors Working on Multiple Projects 0

Caveat Venditor (Supplier Beware): The Importance of Accurate Accounting When Providing Materials to Contractors Working on Multiple Projects

A recent New Jersey Appellate Division case imposes a significant burden on lien-claimant material suppliers that supply materials to contractors on multiple construction projects. As discussed in the February 13, 2013, article “A Duty to Inquire Under Lien Law,” New Jersey Law Journal, Vol. 211 – No. 6, the court in L&W Supply Corp. v. DeSilva, addressed what is necessary for a material supplier to satisfy its obligation to apply payments on the account from which the payment obligation arises in order to preserve its construction lien rights, if any.