Tagged: Subpoenas

Online News Sources Have Standing to Protect Free Speech Rights for Anonymous Users, According to New Jersey Appellate Division 0

Online News Sources Have Standing to Protect Free Speech Rights for Anonymous Users, According to New Jersey Appellate Division

Online newspapers, internet service providers, and website hosts have standing to assert the constitutional rights of their users, according to the New Jersey Appellate Division’s recent unpublished decision in Trawinski v. Doe. In Trawinski, the Appellate Division affirmed the denial of a plaintiff’s request for a subpoena requiring NJ.com to disclose the identity of an anonymous commenter. Underlying plaintiff’s request were allegedly defamatory remarks made by an anonymous poster using the screen name “EPLifer2” concerning plaintiff and her husband, a borough council member of Elmwood Park.

Third Circuit Clarifies that Reasonable Basis Standard Appropriate Quantum of Proof to Apply Crime-Fraud Exception to Attorney-Client Privilege 0

Third Circuit Clarifies that Reasonable Basis Standard Appropriate Quantum of Proof to Apply Crime-Fraud Exception to Attorney-Client Privilege

Clarifying the proofs necessary to apply the crime-fraud exception, the Third Circuit Court of Appeals in In re: Grand Jury recently held that a “reasonable basis” standard should be used, explaining that such a standard affords sufficient predictability for attorneys and clients without providing undue protection to those who seek to abuse the attorney-client and the work-product privileges afforded to them.

New York Court Upholds Separate Entity Rule, Quashes Non-Party Subpoenas Seeking Information on Overseas Bank Accounts 0

New York Court Upholds Separate Entity Rule, Quashes Non-Party Subpoenas Seeking Information on Overseas Bank Accounts

In Ayyash v. Koleilat, the Supreme Court of the State of New York, New York County, upheld and arguably extended the New York “separate entity” rule, which provides that each branch of a bank is treated as a separate entity, in no way concerned with accounts maintained by depositors in other branches or at a home office. Under this rule, a New York branch cannot be compelled to turn over assets maintained at another branch of the same bank. The Court’s decision appears to extend this rule to hold that — at least in circumstances where international comity considerations support broad application of the separate entity rule — a New York branch cannot be compelled to provide information or discovery concerning assets maintained at a foreign branch.